New Adopt-A-Shoreline Groups Begin Bagging Trash

Farrington Pt. west boat ramps

Farrington Pt. west boat ramps

Fishing Access at Big Woods Rd.

Fishing Access at Big Woods Rd.

Three new Adopt-A-Shoreline groups began their cleanups in April-May period.  The UNC Kenan-Flagler Executive Development Program group is led by Kathleen Fernan.  She and 7 of her co-workers  have adopted a stretch of shoreline to the west of the second set of Farrington Pt. boat ramps operated by the NC Wildlife Resources Commission (NC WRC).  They collected 16 bags of trash and two tires.

The Canines for CJL group have adopted a heavily used NC WRC fishing access off Big Woods Rd. In addition to the Adopt-A-Shoreline sign, Clean Jordan Lake also posted a bilingual sign to explain to recreational users of the lake why litter is harmful to natural habitats and potentially to water quality.

Mark Berman, leader of the group, and his wife Nina Verin recruited five others to join them. They had the tedious task of removing  trash strewn among bushes and down a steep, rocky embankment. This hard-working group collected 18 bags of trash in two hours.

CFCJL

CFCJL

Mark said afterward  "What a mess!  It's very discouraging that there are so many people who think nothing of littering their soda bottles, water bottles, propane cans, beer cans, beer bottles, etc."

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Craig Pederson and his wife Annalee chose "24 Paws"  in honor of their four dogs and two cats.

They regularly walk their dogs in the NC WRC Gameland Access just to the north of the Northeast Creek bridge on Rt. 751, about 4 miles south of I40.

To date, they have been collecting trash into tens of bags near the shoreline.  The next step is to drive a pickup truck down the access road to haul the bags out..

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IMG_0945

Shoreline users often ask why the NC WRC does not place trash containers  at  access points such as these  adopted by three new groups and others in our program.  The answer is that the NC WRC manages hundreds of access points like these across the state but does have the budget nor the staff to deal with trash.

As a pilot project, Clean Jordan Lake has received permission from the NC WRC to put trash containers at adopted sites. These will need to be serviced routinely by our volunteers taking considerably more visits than the agreement to clean sites three times per year.

Even if our pilot program proves successful,  users of the NC WRC managed lands should abide by the same common-sense guideline as for any wilderness access. That is: pack out what you bring in.

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